$1.9m for crash hot spot

$1.9m for crash hot spot

Work on a $1.9m project to improve the intersection of the Batlow Road and Snowy Mountains Highway began this week and will continue through until October.
Work on a $1.9m project to improve the intersection of the Batlow Road and Snowy Mountains Highway began this week and will continue through until October.

While it’s not a complete redesign of the intersection for which some have been lobbying for years, there is welcome news this week with work beginning on a $1.9 million road safety upgrade on the Snowy Mountains highway at the Batlow Road intersection, seven kilometres west of Tumut.

The upgrade is part of the NSW Government’s Safer Roads State Blackspot program, which delivers direct improvements at high risk crash locations across the state.

The project includes widening highway shoulders, installing new safety barriers, improving drainage, installing lighting and extending the left turning lane on the Snowy Mountains Highway at the intersection.

Minister for Roads, Duncan Gay, said the NSW Government was committed to reducing death and trauma on roads and delivering safety improvements at known crash locations will go a long way to helping achieve this.

“The Snowy Mountains Highway upgrade will improve the road surface and reduce the crash risk near the Batlow Road intersection and at the road curve immediately east,” Mr Gay said.

Work to upgrade the 650 metre stretch of highway began yesterday and will run through until October, weekdays between 7am and 6pm and 8am and 1pm on Saturdays.

To deliver the upgrades, the highway will be reduced to a single lane operating under contra flow and a speed limit of 40 km/h during work hours to ensure the safety of road users and workers.

The Safer Roads State Blackspot program is funded by the Community Road Safety Fund, which directs every cent from speed camera fines to road safety initiatives.

The intersection, and bend to the Tumut-side of it, has been a crash hot-spot in recent years.

Tumut Council has previously lobbied for the upgrade to the intersection, while Batlow resident Janine Kovacs has been a long-time proponent of a complete redesign of the intersection, citing alignment and sight distance concerns.