Celebrating threatened species day

Celebrating threatened species day

 

Tilly Graham, Taylah Graham, and Mac Mason inspecting Southern Pigmy Perch. Bonbongo  students learned about endangered plants and animals as part of National Threatened Species Day.
Tilly Graham, Taylah Graham, and Mac Mason inspecting Southern Pigmy Perch. Bonbongo students learned about endangered plants and animals as part of National Threatened Species Day.

As part of National Threatened Species Day, students from Bongongo Public School learnt about endangered plants and animals in their local area and the importance of improving their habitats.

The involvement of the students is part of the Adjungbilly Targeted Catchment project which aims to protect and restore local populations of endangered plants and animals found in the catchment.

The workshop was organised by Riverina Local Land Services and Riverina Highlands Landcare Network to help student learn more about some of the unique species in the catchment such as the Booroolong Frog and Macquarie Perch.

Dr David Hunter from the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage explained to the students how the Booroolong Frog, an important local species, has been declining drastically in recent times.

“Some of the key threats to the endangered Booroolong Frog are stream bank erosion, woody weeds such as willows and the destruction of their breeding habitat,” Dr Hunter said.

Luke Pearce from NSW Department of Primary Industries Fisheries described how there were once up to 16 species of native fish in the Adjungbilly Creek with only four now persisting including the endangered Macquarie Perch.

Over the past two years, landholders, researchers and agencies have been working together to fencing, revegetating and protecting a total of 180 ha of land in the Adjungbilly catchment.

Riverina Local Land Services, Cherie White said the works have also supported farmers to improve their land management, for example fencing and revegetation of gullies has helped with the stock movements whilst providing shade and shelter.

“Furthermore fencing along creeklines and the provision of alternative stock water has enabled farmers to subdivide their paddocks and provide more secure watering points,” said Cherie.

The Adjungbilly Targeted Project is one of a number of funding programs currently available to landholders in the region to help in the recovery of threatened species as well as supporting productive farms and sustainable landscapes.