Region’s NAPLAN performances

Region’s NAPLAN performances

Students at St Joseph’s Primary School in Adelong, who have the lowest percentage of low performing pupils in the region.

St Joseph’s Primary School is the highest performing school in the region when it comes to NAPLAN tests, national data has revealed.

Fourteen per cent of their students are in the top quarter of Australian students when it comes to the test, and only 19 per cent are in the bottom quarter, making their performance above the national average.

NAPLAN (National Assessment Program for Literacy and Numeracy) is a standardised test for years three, five, seven, and nine students across the country that examines their skills in spelling, grammar, writing, reading, and numeracy.

It takes place every year, with results posted to the government MySchools website with each schools’ performance and their performance in previous years available for parents to view.

The results are released as the percentage of each schools’ students in the bottom and top quarters of students in the country, along with the middle half.

Talbingo Primary School had the highest percentage locally of top performing students, with 27 per cent of their students in the top quarter of Australians who took the test. 33 per cent of their students were in the bottom quarter.

Batlow’s St Mary’s Primary School had 35 per cent of their students in the bottom quarter and 13 in the top; McAuley Catholic Central School had 23 per cent in the bottom and 12 per cent in the top; Tumut Public School had 37 per cent in the bottom and 14 in the top; Adelong Public School had 39 per cent in the bottom quarter and 6 per cent in the top; and Franklin Primary School had 58 per cent in the bottom quarter and 1 per cent in the top.

When it comes to high school, nearly half of Tumut High School students are in the bottom quarter of Australian students for their 2016 NAPLAN results, the data has revealed.

47 per cent of students are in the bottom quarter against 25 per cent nationally, with seven per cent in the top quarter and 45 per cent in the middle half.

This result is almost identical to their performance in 2015, and an improvement on the 51 per cent in the bottom quarter in 2014.

Over half of Batlow Technology High School students are in the bottom quarter of NAPLAN results nationally, with 55 per cent in that bracket, and only 1 per cent in the top quarter of Australian students.

Gadara School’s data was not recorded.

The NAPLAN results also provide a measurement of the average student socio-economic disadvantage at schools, calculated from measures like geographical location, parents’ occupation and education level, and indigenous heritage.

It’s called the ICSEA value (Index of Community Socio-Educational Advantage), and has an average score of 1000, with a lower number meaning a higher level of disadvantage.

Tumut High School and Batlow Technology School both have higher than average levels of socio-economic disadvantage, with scores of 945 and 958 respectively.

For Primary Schools, the socio-economic status of the school and students was roughly correlated with achievement, with St Joseph’s Primary School having both the highest level of privilege and also the highest NAPLAN results, and Franklin Primary School having both the lowest level of socioeconomic advantage and also the highest percentage of students in the bottom quarter of Australian NAPLAN performers.

A report from the Australian Council of Education Research released last week showed that students from the most disadvantaged socioeconomic backgrounds are about three years behind in their education standards than those from the most privileged backgrounds.

Students in provincial schools, which includes schools in this region, are about one year behind those in municipal schools, and this gap between city and country standards of education has not changed in 20 years.

The biggest impact factors on academic achievement for Australian students are a low socioeconomic background, whether or not they attend a school with a strong focus on academic success, and being bullied.

Tumut, Batlow and Adelong performed similarly to the high schools in Tumbarumba, Temora, Cootamundra and Leeton, better than the high schools in Gundagai, Junee and Griffith, and worse than schools in Jindabyne, Albury and Wagga Wagga.